TOSCA

by Giacomo Puccini

Step into the web of politics, police brutality, betrayal, jealousy and murder in Puccini’s blood-soaked and intense Tosca. In Rome, the fiery and celebrated singer Floria Tosca has no idea that her life, and that of the man she loves, will irrevocably change the very next day. In a whirlwind of events, Tosca is forced to save her rebellious lover from the tainted hands of the treacherous chief of police and must take a stand while looking death in the face. Will she murder for the man she loves? Will she save her lover in time? What will become of her?

With passionate arias and soaring, sensuous melodies, Tosca’s power and raw emotion will leave you breathless.


All performances at the San Diego Civic Theatre
2 hours and 40 minutes with two intermissions
In Italian with projected English supertitles - Learn more »

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PODCASTS

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Meeting Cavaradossi: tenor Gwyn Hughes Jones

Welsh tenor Gwyn Hughes Jones has a lot to say about the tenor voice, his lirico-spinto forebears like Gigli and Martinelli, as well as the role of Mario Cavaradossi in Tosca. Enjoy this interview as we look forward to his performances, opening this weekend!


Thursday, February 4, 2016

Meet the Maestro: Massimo Zanetti

Maestro Zanetti was last with us in 2014, conducting A Masked Ball by Verdi. Some of you will remember, this was a tough time for the company. The maestro reflects on that moment of our history, as well as on the genius of Puccini and his love of Tosca. 


Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Meeting Tosca: soprano, Alexia Voulgaridou

Our Tosca this season, soprano Alexia Voulgaridou, has been singing this role to great success all over the world, as well as roles such as Cio-Cio San, Marguerite and Liu. In this interview, she discusses Tosca with a very fresh 'take' on who this character really is.


Monday, February 1, 2016

Meet the Director: Lesley Koenig

Stage director Lesley Koenig was last with us when she directed a terrific production of Un ballo in maschera (A Masked Ball) for us in 2014. She's back as the stage director of our current production of Tosca. In this interview she speaks about the piece itself as well as shares a bit of the process that she goes through in order to approach such a well-known opera in a fresh and engaging way.


Friday, January 29, 2016

Meet Baron Scarpia: bass-baritone Greer Grimsley

Bass-baritone Greer Grimsley is back in one of his favorite roles: Scarpia in Puccini's Tosca. In this interview he talks about the character and reflects a bit on what it is that makes this role so fulfilling and downright fun for him to sing!


Thursday, January 28, 2016

Meeting Scarpia: bass-baritone Greer Grimsley

Our favorite bass-baritone returns for one of his favorite roles: Greer Grimsley sings Baron Scarpia in Puccini's Tosca. Greer has some definite ideas about who this character is, what motivates him and how to sing him. Tune in to our first podcast of the 2016 season!


Monday, October 19, 2015

Who Is Tosca?

Let's dig a little deeper! Tosca is a fictional character, of course, but her background was painstakingly detailed from history by her original creator, playwright Victorien Sardou. Nic Reveles gives us the low-down on that history, putting the story in a historical context. 


Sunday, July 12, 2015

Let's Talk About Madama Butterfly

The tale of Giacomo Puccini's operatic journey continues with Madama Butterfly which followed Tosca. Your host Nic Reveles talks about the things that the two operas share, Puccini's 'signatures' as a composer, as well as some of the things that make them different.


Monday, June 29, 2015

Let's Talk About Tosca

In this episode we listen to how Puccini "gets to the point", that there's no needless prelude or overture, that we always get right to the action when it comes to his operas, especially Tosca. Which is odd, because the Sardou play, La Tosca, upon which the opera was based is exactly the opposite of that!


Monday, June 8, 2015

The Operas of 2016

In the first podcast of the season, Director of Community Engagement Nicolas Reveles takes an overall look at the operas coming up: Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Great Scott. We've got a lot to look forward to!



STARS IN THE SALON

Tosca - February 4, 2016 at 5:30pm

Join the stars of Tosca in Stars in the Salon. This is a thrilling experience for anyone who loves opera. We welcome our distinguished guest panels for a provocative look at the music, characters and behind-the-scenes work which is so important to each production. The Civic Theatre’s beautiful Beverly Sills Salon acts as the setting for this enjoyable discussion where audience members have a chance to meet the stars and ask their own questions of the leading singers, conductors and directors first hand! All sessions are open to the public and free of charge.

► Learn More

SUGGESTED MEDIA: TOSCA

CDs

Maria Callas, Giuseppe Di Stefano, Tito Gobbi, Victor de Sabata conducting the Orchestra and Chorus of the Teatro alla Scala. EMI Classics

Leontyne Price, Giuseppe Di Stefano, Giuseppe Taddei, Herbert Von Karajan conducting the Vienna Philharmonic. DECCA

Angela Gheorghiu, Roberto Alagna, Ruggero Raimondi, Antonio Pappano conducting the Royal Opera Chorus and Orchestra of the Royal Opera House. EMI Classics

DVDs

Angela Gheorghiu, Jonas Kaufmann, Bryn Terfel, Antonio Pappano conducting the Royal Opera Chorus and Orchestra of the Royal Opera House. EMI Classics (also Blu-ray)

Hildegard Behrens, Plácido Domingo, Cornell MacNeil, Giuseppe Sinopoli conducting the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and Chorus. DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON

TOSCA

Rome, June 14, 1800

The Battle of Marengo was fought this day in Piedmont, Italy, between 28,000 French forces led by Napoleon Bonaparte and 30,000 Austrian forces led by General Melas. Although Napoleon appeared defeated in the morning, the French overcame the Austrians in a surprise attack at night, driving them out of Italy.

Act I

The Church of Sant' Andrea della Valle

Cesare Angelotti, an escaping political prisoner, searches for a key to open a chapel and hides there as the church’s Sacristan enters, grumbling about his work. The artist Mario Cavaradossi arrives to continue work on his portrait of Mary Magdalene, inspired by a young woman he has seen the day before in prayer. He compares the raven beauty of his love, the singer Floria Tosca, with that of the blonde Magdalene. Angelotti comes out of hiding, and as he explains his escape from the Castel Sant’Angelo, Tosca calls to Cavaradossi, who gives Angelotti food and hurries him back into the chapel. Tosca is certain she has heard Cavaradossi with another woman and jealously questions him. They set a rendezvous at his villa that evening. As the artist returns to work, Tosca suddenly recognizes the Magdalene as the Marchesa Attavanti, whom she deems must be Cavaradossi’s lover. He assures Tosca that he loves only her, and she departs. Cavaradossi realizes that Angelotti is Attavanti’s brother, and she has hidden a disguise of women’s clothing in the chapel. Cavaradossi sends Angelotti off to hide deep in the well of his garden, but upon hearing a canon signaling a prisoner has escaped from the Castel Sant’Angelo, the two flee together to the villa, mistakenly dropping a fan, part of the disguise. The Sacristan announces a celebration around the defeat of Napoleon, and in the throes of jubilation, the Baron Scarpia, Chief of Police, arrives in search of Angelotti. The Sacristan mumbles that the empty food basket in the chapel must mean that Angelotti had indeed hidden there. When Tosca returns to tell Cavaradossi that she can’t meet that evening due to her part in the evening’s celebration around Napoleon’s defeat, Scarpia shows her the fan decorated with the Attavanti crest, and muses that surely Attavanti and Cavaradossi are lovers. Tosca tearfully vows vengeance and leaves for the villa where she is sure to find the two lovers. Scarpia sends his men to follow her and ruminates on the joy of two possible conquests that evening – capturing his political enemy and taking Tosca for himself.

Act II

The Farnese Palace

Scarpia anticipates his evening’s victories. Sciarrone, an agent of Scarpia, is sent to fetch Tosca following her performance. Spoletta arrives with news that although Angelotti has not been found, he has arrested Cavaradossi, whom Scarpia interrogates. Tosca arrives just as Cavaradossi is taken off to an adjoining room to be tortured. Although she disavows any knowledge of where Angelotti might be, she is finally so overcome by Cavaradossi’s screams that she reveals the hiding place. When he realizes what Tosca has revealed, Cavaradossi is outraged. Sciarrone rushes in to announce that Napoleon has in fact won the Battle of Marengo, a defeat for Scarpia but joyful news for Cavaradossi. He is taken off to the Castel Sant’Angelo to be hanged at sunrise. Scarpia suggests Tosca yield herself to him in exchange for her lover's life. Fighting off his advances, she protests her fate to God, having dedicated her life to art and love. Spoletta tells Scarpia that the gallows is built, forcing Tosca to give in to Scarpia or see her lover killed. Scarpia changes his orders from death by hanging to a mock execution by firing squad, after which Cavaradossi will be freed. Scarpia writes a safe-conduct out of Rome for the lovers. As he rushes victoriously toward Tosca, she kills him. Wrenching the safe conduct document from his fingers, she slips from the room.

Act III

The Roof of Castel Sant' Angelo

Awaiting execution, Cavaradossi bribes the jailer to take a farewell note to Tosca. Writing it, he is overcome with memories of an evening of love, and gives way to despair. Tosca rushes in to tell him of Scarpia’s death by her hands. She explains the mock execution and exhorts him to fake his death well. The lovers revel in their upcoming triumph. The firing squad carries out its orders and fire upon Cavaradossi, who falls convincingly. Tosca begs him to remain silent and still until the squad has departed, then urges him to rise and escape. When he fails to move, she discovers that Scarpia's treachery has reached from beyond the grave: the bullets were real. Calling out that she and Scarpia will meet before God, Tosca leaps to her death.

TOSCA POST-OPERA CAST PARTY

Saturday, February 13 at 10:30pm
The US Grant Hotel

Join us immediately following the opening night performance when we’ll journey a few short blocks to The US Grant. We’ll meet the artists from Tosca and enjoy a wine and champagne reception with light hors d’oeuvres and desserts. Post-Opera Cast Party tickets are $75 per person. ADD TO YOUR TICKET ORDER TODAY!


TASTE OF OPERA Special Event:

The Curious Fork Cooking Class
OPERA CLASSICS: TOSCA

The Curious Fork

► BUY TICKETS   ► Learn More

Friday, January 22, 6:30PM

ADDRESS: 2512 Via de la Valle, Suite 102, Solana Beach, CA 92075
COST: $49 per person
DIRECTIONS: From I-5 San Diego Fwy: Take the Via de la Valle exit, EXIT 36; Go West onto County Hwy-S8/Via de la Valle for less than 1 mile; Your destination is just past Pimlico Dr in same plaza as Pamplemousse (if you reach Del Mar Downs Rd you've gone a little too far)
PARKING: Ample free parking in plaza parking lots

The raw emotion evoking arias and sensual melodies of Puccini convey the passionate story of love, politics, police brutality, betrayal, jealousy and murder. Tosca’s Roman setting provides the perfect gastronomic backdrop. Nicolas Reveles' expert narration, and Chef Katherine's culinary interpretation of this opera will shock, amuse, and satisfy. Recipes: Fettuccini with White Wine Braised Mussels and Cumin Sauce; Fennel, Radicchio, and Blood Orange Salad with Dill Vinaigrette; Chicken Saltimbocca and Braised Artichokes; Honey Ricotta Cake with Vin Santo Roasted Pears. All dishes are gluten free.


STARS IN THE SALON

Tosca - February 4, 2016 at 5:30pm

Join the stars of Tosca in Stars in the Salon. This is a thrilling experience for anyone who loves opera. We welcome our distinguished guest panels for a provocative look at the music, characters and behind-the-scenes work which is so important to each production. The Civic Theatre’s beautiful Beverly Sills Salon acts as the setting for this enjoyable discussion where audience members have a chance to meet the stars and ask their own questions of the leading singers, conductors and directors first hand! All sessions are open to the public and free of charge.

► Learn More